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Non League Football Under The Microscope

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BuiltWithNOF

Eastbourne Borough fans celebrate - August Bank Holiday Monday 2003                                Photograph by Sam Hicks

Cromer Town FC

Cabbell Park, Mill Road, Cromer, Norfolk
Telephone: 01263 512185
Nickname: 
Anglian Combination
Website: None

Note Cabbell Park was a gift to the town of Cromer by Mrs Benjamin B. Bond-Cabbell of Cromer Hall in remembrance of the townfolk who lost their lives during the Great War.  Originally named Bond-Cabbell Park it was opened by its namesake on 8 September 1922.

For many years the focal point of the ground was the wooden grandstand which was an original fixture, and had “Cromer” painted on the rear wall, with “Football Club” added on the front fascia. Sadly, it gradually fell into disrepair and was eventually condemned as unsafe in the early 1990s. There were plans for a smart new replacement (see artist’s impression below) but this never materialised. Instead there now stands a more modest covered area, albeit with a fascia board stating the Club name as “Cromer FC”.

The dugouts originally stood in front of the stand which was set back a little way from the perimeter rail, but newer wooden replacements now straddle the half-way line on the far touchline. The home dugout is of a slightly different design is also a little larger, although one imagines they were both originally constructed at the same time.

A comfortable clubhouse and bar now stands behind the near corner flag as one enters the ground, and the slightly undulating pitch is fully railed. There are however, no floodlights in place for this Club which lifted the Anglian Combination title in 2005/06. DB

The covered area at Cabbell Park, occupying the same site as the original 1920s stand (below), photographed in 1981 by Bob Lilliman

The original stand in an advanced state of disrepair. This photograph featured on the front cover of the first ever issue of ‘Groundtastic’ in 1995, which also included an optimistic artist’s impression for a replacement produced five years earlier (below).